What is a fast pro agility time?

How long is pro agility?

This test is also called the Pro Agility Shuttle or 5-10-5 Shuttle. It is called the 20 yard shuttle as the total distance covered is 20 yards. 20 yards = 18.3 meters.

What is pro agility?

The Pro Agility (also known as the 5-10-5 or short shuttle) is one of the standard tests used to evaluate agility and change of direction performance. … Today we will talk about how the crossover impacts the Pro Agility, and how this drill can be used as a tool to get quality reps of agility work.

What is a good pro-agility time for high school?

Pro-agility: We both want all of our athletes under 5 seconds ideally on their pro-agility. The fastest junior high/high school athlete I have timed was a 4.41. For our high level high school girls and guys, we want them under 4.5 seconds. The pro-agility is a great test to determine change of direction speed.

What is a good pro-agility time?

It’s good for overall agility, speed and lateral quickness. A shuttle run time below four seconds is generally considered great, with the best players closer to the 3.8-second range. Kevin Kasper of Iowa set the shuttle run record at 3.73 seconds in 2001.

What is a fast 10 yard split?

Metcalf’s 10-yard split of his 4.33-second 40-yard dash clocked in at 1.45 seconds. This is the fastest 10-split by any combine runner in my database (starting in 2003).

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Is a 4.5 40 fast?

What people tend to forget is that a 40-yard dash time of 4.5 or even 4.6 seconds is blistering fast. “If you have a kid that runs a legit 4.5 then he’s plenty fast enough to play Division I football,” the coach from the SEC said. “That’s still a very fast time – even for running backs.”

What is a fast 3 cone drill time?

Top 10 Fastest 3-Cone Drill Times

rank time (seconds) year
1 6.28 2018
2 6.42 2011
3 6.44 2011
=4 6.45 2019

What is a good L drill time?

A good 40-time is going to be in the 4.4 to 4.5 second range for receivers, running backs, and defensive backs. 4.6-4.8 is what you could expect from a lot of the other positions – linebackers, defensive ends, tight ends, and some quarterbacks. Most linemen are going to run 4.9 or higher.